Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Privacy Policy Autism Speech DiegoSaysPro

Privacy Policy

GreenBubbleLabs built the Autism Speech DiegoSaysPro app as a Commercial app. This SERVICE is provided by GreenBubbleLabs and is intended for use as is.
This page is used to inform website visitors regarding my policies with the collection, use, and disclosure of Personal Information if anyone decided to use my Service.
If you choose to use my Service, then you agree to the collection and use of information in relation to this policy. The Personal Information that I collect is used for providing and improving the Service. I will not use or share your information with anyone except as described in this Privacy Policy.
The terms used in this Privacy Policy have the same meanings as in our Terms and Conditions, which is accessible at Autism Speech DiegoSaysPro unless otherwise defined in this Privacy Policy.
Information Collection and Use
For a better experience, while using our Service, I may require you to provide us with certain personally identifiable information, including but not limited to CAMERA, AUDIO RECORD. The information that I request is retained on your device and is not collected by me in any way
The app does use third party services that may collect information used to identify you.
Link to privacy policy of third party service providers used by the app
Log Data
I want to inform you that whenever you use my Service, in a case of an error in the app I collect data and information (through third party products) on your phone called Log Data. This Log Data may include information such as your device Internet Protocol (“IP”) address, device name, operating system version, the configuration of the app when utilizing my Service, the time and date of your use of the Service, and other statistics.
Cookies
Cookies are files with small amount of data that is commonly used an anonymous unique identifier. These are sent to your browser from the website that you visit and are stored on your device internal memory.
This Service does not use these “cookies” explicitly. However, the app may use third party code and libraries that use “cookies” to collection information and to improve their services. You have the option to either accept or refuse these cookies and know when a cookie is being sent to your device. If you choose to refuse our cookies, you may not be able to use some portions of this Service.
Service Providers
I may employ third-party companies and individuals due to the following reasons:
  • To facilitate our Service;
  • To provide the Service on our behalf;
  • To perform Service-related services; or
  • To assist us in analyzing how our Service is used.
I want to inform users of this Service that these third parties have access to your Personal Information. The reason is to perform the tasks assigned to them on our behalf. However, they are obligated not to disclose or use the information for any other purpose.
Security
I value your trust in providing us your Personal Information, thus we are striving to use commercially acceptable means of protecting it. But remember that no method of transmission over the internet, or method of electronic storage is 100% secure and reliable, and I cannot guarantee its absolute security.
Links to Other Sites
This Service may contain links to other sites. If you click on a third-party link, you will be directed to that site. Note that these external sites are not operated by me. Therefore, I strongly advise you to review the Privacy Policy of these websites. I have no control over and assume no responsibility for the content, privacy policies, or practices of any third-party sites or services.
Children’s Privacy
These Services do not address anyone under the age of 13. I do not knowingly collect personally identifiable information from children under 13. In the case I discover that a child under 13 has provided me with personal information, I immediately delete this from our servers. If you are a parent or guardian and you are aware that your child has provided us with personal information, please contact me so that I will be able to do necessary actions.
Changes to This Privacy Policy
I may update our Privacy Policy from time to time. Thus, you are advised to review this page periodically for any changes. I will notify you of any changes by posting the new Privacy Policy on this page. These changes are effective immediately after they are posted on this page.
Contact Us
If you have any questions or suggestions about my Privacy Policy, do not hesitate to contact me.
This privacy policy page was created at privacypolicytemplate.net and modified/generated by App Privacy Policy Generator

Privacy policy Autism Read & Write Pro

Privacy Policy

GreenBubbleLabs built the Autism Read & Write Pro app as a Commercial app. This SERVICE is provided by GreenBubbleLabs and is intended for use as is.
This page is used to inform website visitors regarding my policies with the collection, use, and disclosure of Personal Information if anyone decided to use my Service.
If you choose to use my Service, then you agree to the collection and use of information in relation to this policy. The Personal Information that I collect is used for providing and improving the Service. I will not use or share your information with anyone except as described in this Privacy Policy.
The terms used in this Privacy Policy have the same meanings as in our Terms and Conditions, which is accessible at Autism Read & Write Pro[App Name] unless otherwise defined in this Privacy Policy.
Information Collection and Use
For a better experience, while using our Service, I may require you to provide us with certain personally identifiable information, including but not limited to CAMERA. The information that I request is retained on your device and is not collected by me in any way
The app does use third party services that may collect information used to identify you.
Link to privacy policy of third party service providers used by the app
Log Data
I want to inform you that whenever you use my Service, in a case of an error in the app I collect data and information (through third party products) on your phone called Log Data. This Log Data may include information such as your device Internet Protocol (“IP”) address, device name, operating system version, the configuration of the app when utilizing my Service, the time and date of your use of the Service, and other statistics.
Cookies
Cookies are files with small amount of data that is commonly used an anonymous unique identifier. These are sent to your browser from the website that you visit and are stored on your device internal memory.
This Service does not use these “cookies” explicitly. However, the app may use third party code and libraries that use “cookies” to collection information and to improve their services. You have the option to either accept or refuse these cookies and know when a cookie is being sent to your device. If you choose to refuse our cookies, you may not be able to use some portions of this Service.
Service Providers
I may employ third-party companies and individuals due to the following reasons:
  • To facilitate our Service;
  • To provide the Service on our behalf;
  • To perform Service-related services; or
  • To assist us in analyzing how our Service is used.
I want to inform users of this Service that these third parties have access to your Personal Information. The reason is to perform the tasks assigned to them on our behalf. However, they are obligated not to disclose or use the information for any other purpose.
Security
I value your trust in providing us your Personal Information, thus we are striving to use commercially acceptable means of protecting it. But remember that no method of transmission over the internet, or method of electronic storage is 100% secure and reliable, and I cannot guarantee its absolute security.
Links to Other Sites
This Service may contain links to other sites. If you click on a third-party link, you will be directed to that site. Note that these external sites are not operated by me. Therefore, I strongly advise you to review the Privacy Policy of these websites. I have no control over and assume no responsibility for the content, privacy policies, or practices of any third-party sites or services.
Children’s Privacy
These Services do not address anyone under the age of 13. I do not knowingly collect personally identifiable information from children under 13. In the case I discover that a child under 13 has provided me with personal information, I immediately delete this from our servers. If you are a parent or guardian and you are aware that your child has provided us with personal information, please contact me so that I will be able to do necessary actions.
Changes to This Privacy Policy
I may update our Privacy Policy from time to time. Thus, you are advised to review this page periodically for any changes. I will notify you of any changes by posting the new Privacy Policy on this page. These changes are effective immediately after they are posted on this page.
Contact Us
If you have any questions or suggestions about my Privacy Policy, do not hesitate to contact me.
This privacy policy page was created at privacypolicytemplate.net and modified/generated by App Privacy Policy Generator

Sunday, January 7, 2018

Potential new autism drug shows promise in mice


Researchers are hopeful that a new drug may be able to restore an electrical signaling imbalance in the brain found in virtually all forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Credit: © Lori Werhane / Fotolia
Scientists have performed a successful test of a possible new drug in a mouse model of an autism disorder. The candidate drug, called NitroSynapsin, largely corrected electrical, behavioral and brain abnormalities in the mice.
NitroSynapsin is intended to restore an electrical signaling imbalance in the brain found in virtually all forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
"This drug candidate is poised to go into clinical trials, and we think it might be effective against multiple forms of autism," said senior investigator Stuart Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Hannah and Eugene Step Chair at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), who is also a clinical neurologist caring for patients.
The research, published on today in the journal Nature Communications, was a collaboration involving scientists at the Scintillon Institute; the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine; Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and other institutions. Lipton's fellow senior investigators on the project were Drs. Nobuki Nakanishi and Shichun Tu of the Scintillon Institute in San Diego....read more

Thursday, January 26, 2017

New clinical trial shows 'promising results' for ASD treatment

The gut microbiota is a fascinating part of the human body; it plays a crucial role in immunity and keeps our bodies healthy. New research suggests that the gut microbiome may even hold the key to a potential treatment for autism.
[girl holding autism sign]
New research shows some promising early results for ASD treatment.
The gut microbiota is the collection of microorganisms living inside our body. We havetens of trillions of microbes living in our guts, totaling more than 3 million genes.
Our gut microbiomes are crucial for our immunity and overall health. They act as a barrier against other harmful microorganisms, and they help with digestion and the production of some vitamins.
Previous research has suggested that the composition of the microbiome influences the development of certain diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, deadly bacteria infections, enterocolitis, and obesity.
Some studies have even linked the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome with autism spectrum disorders (ASD).
ASD is a developmental disability affecting approximately 1 in 68 children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
New research, published in the journal Microbiome, examines autism treatment options by improving the gut microbiome........ read more

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Specific gut bacteria reverse autism-like behavior in mice

The number of bacteria in our guts outnumbers the cells of our body. That fact alone makes them a worthy target for research. There is an estimated 1 kilogram of bacteria within each average human adult. Predominantly known for their role in digestion, the range of gut bacteria's influence is only slowly becoming better understood. Gut microbes produce neuroactive compounds and are now known to significantly alter cognitive function and behavior patterns. The so-called gut-brain axis also plays an important role in the early development and maturation of the immune and endocrine systems. The latest study to examine the impact of gut bacteria on neurological behavior is published this week in the journal Cell.

Gut bacteria and autism

The Baylor College team demonstrated that by adding a single, specific species of bacteria into the guts of mice that displayed autism-related social behavior, they could reverse some of the deficits. Past research into modifying autistic behavior has focused on affecting change via electrical brain stimulation. As Mauro Costa-Mattioli, the senior author of the current study, says, "here we have, perhaps, a new approach."

See more...

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Suppression of epigenetic brain proteins induces autism-like syndrome

Regulation of a family of brain proteins known as bromodomain and extra-terminal domain containing transcription regulators (BETs) plays a key role in normal cognition and behavior, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published advanced online on September 21 and in print October 19 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

The Mount Sinai study focuses on epigenetics, the study of changes in the action of human genes caused by molecules that regulate when, where and to what degree our genetic material is activated, rather than focusing on genetic changes in the DNA code we inherit from our parents.

While scientists have traditionally focused on finding individual genes responsible for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), recent research has found links between epigenetic regulation and ASD in human patients. Such regulation derives, in part, from the function of specialized protein complexes that bind to specific DNA sequences and either encourage or shut down the expression of a given gene.

Mount Sinai researchers found that BETs, a family of epigenetic regulators that bind to many different genes and contribute to the copying of these genes into messenger RNA, the template used by the cell to make proteins, play a key role in the regulation of normal neuronal development and function. The Mount Sinai study was conducted using a new type of pharmacological compound that does not inactivate BET proteins but, rather, prevents them from binding to the genes... read more

Wednesday, June 3, 2015

VERY IMPORTANT DISCOVERY!!!! Missing link found between brain, immune system--with major disease implications

Implications profound for neurological diseases from autism to Alzheimer's to multiple sclerosis
  • Vessels directly connecting brain, lymphatic system exist despite decades of doctrine that they don't
  • Finding may have substantial implications for major neurological diseases
  • Game-changing discovery opens new areas of research, transforms existing ones
  • Major gap in understanding of the human body revealed
  • 'They'll have to change the textbooks'
In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. That such vessels could have escaped detection when the lymphatic system has been so thoroughly mapped throughout the body is surprising on its own, but the true significance of the discovery lies in the effects it could have on the study and treatment of neurological diseases ranging from autism to Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis.
"Instead of asking, 'How do we study the immune response of the brain?' 'Why do multiple sclerosis patients have the immune attacks?' now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels," said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA's Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). "It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can't be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions."
"We believe that for every neurological disease that has an immune component to it, these vessels may play a major role," Kipnis said. "Hard to imagine that these vessels would not be involved in a [neurological] disease with an immune component."
New Discovery in Human Body
Kevin Lee, PhD, chairman of the UVA Department of Neuroscience, described his reaction to the discovery by Kipnis' lab: "The first time these guys showed me the basic result, I just said one sentence: 'They'll have to change the textbooks.' There has never been a lymphatic system for the central nervous system, and it was very clear from that first singular observation - and they've done many studies since then to bolster the finding - that it will fundamentally change the way people look at the central nervous system's relationship with the immune system."
Even Kipnis was skeptical initially. "I really did not believe there are structures in the body that we are not aware of. I thought the body was mapped," he said. "I thought that these discoveries ended somewhere around the middle of the last century. But apparently they have not."
'Very Well Hidden'
The discovery was made possible by the work of Antoine Louveau, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in Kipnis' lab. The vessels were detected after Louveau developed a method to mount a mouse's meninges - the membranes covering the brain - on a single slide so that they could be examined as a whole. "It was fairly easy, actually," he said. "There was one trick: We fixed the meninges within the skullcap, so that the tissue is secured in its physiological condition, and then we dissected it. If we had done it the other way around, it wouldn't have worked."
After noticing vessel-like patterns in the distribution of immune cells on his slides, he tested for lymphatic vessels and there they were. The impossible existed. The soft-spoken Louveau recalled the moment: "I called Jony [Kipnis] to the microscope and I said, 'I think we have something.'"
As to how the brain's lymphatic vessels managed to escape notice all this time, Kipnis described them as "very well hidden" and noted that they follow a major blood vessel down into the sinuses, an area difficult to image. "It's so close to the blood vessel, you just miss it," he said. "If you don't know what you're after, you just miss it."
"Live imaging of these vessels was crucial to demonstrate their function, and it would not be possible without collaboration with Tajie Harris," Kipnis noted. Harris, a PhD, is an assistant professor of neuroscience and a member of the BIG center. Kipnis also saluted the "phenomenal" surgical skills of Igor Smirnov, a research associate in the Kipnis lab whose work was critical to the imaging success of the study.
Alzheimer's, Autism, MS and Beyond
The unexpected presence of the lymphatic vessels raises a tremendous number of questions that now need answers, both about the workings of the brain and the diseases that plague it. For example, take Alzheimer's disease. "In Alzheimer's, there are accumulations of big protein chunks in the brain," Kipnis said. "We think they may be accumulating in the brain because they're not being efficiently removed by these vessels." He noted that the vessels look different with age, so the role they play in aging is another avenue to explore. And there's an enormous array of other neurological diseases, from autism to multiple sclerosis, that must be reconsidered in light of the presence of something science insisted did not exist.
The New Map of the Lymphatic System
Maps of the lymphatic system: old (left) and updated to reflect UVA's discovery.
Credit: University of Virginia Health System